Thursday, Feb 18, 2021, 15:48 Hardware

Intel Targets Apple Again With The Curious "Go PC" Ad Campaign
The friendship between Apple and Intel came to a rather public close after Apple announced the switch to in-house chips. Although Apple refused to speak ill of Intel or allow for any kind of Mac vs. PC discussions during the presentation, Intel's marketing division has undertaken an entirely different strategy in pursuit of more direct confrontation. At the start of its campaign, Intel came forth with some questionable benchmarks "proving" the new M1 Macs to be inferior in almost all respects. Even the M1's universally touted performance and battery life weren't to be seen in Intel's new benchmarks. Intel's comparison was met by a resigned shake of the head in most software forums and sites, as not only were some of the claims slightly hard to understand, others were also entirely outlandish.

"Go PC"
Now, Intel is stepping up to the bat again in a new campaign, again highlighting how one is much better served by a PC than a Mac. Interestingly, Intel digs up an old phrase for use in the campaign – a phrase that has seen a downturn in usage in recent years. The phrase "PC" as a generic descriptor of all Windows computers had been on its way out of the marketing world. Apple themselves no longer simply call Windows computers "PCs". Intel's new campaign does exactly the opposite and attempts to win over customers by providing countless examples of what a Mac can't do, but a PC can.







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According to a recent Intel tweet, only one can serve both gamers and scientists at the same time. A further claim states that only PCs can provide tablet and touch-mode support along with a supported stylus. Intel apparently entirely ignores that Apple also makes touchscreen tablets (with a purchasable Apple pencil) capable of carrying out PC functions to a certain extent and, since iPadOS 13 and the advent of accessories such as the Magic Keyboard, the iPad has undergone the evolutionary process of beginning to resemble a notebook.

Criticisim & Mockery Of Intel's New Campaign
It's safe to say that Intel hasn't exactly achieved the response it wanted from social media. Answers to some of Intel's "Go PC" tweets include responses ranging from, "Of course, I'll take a PC powered by AMD," to a complete lack of understanding as to what Intel hopes to accomplish. That Intel views a lack of ports on the MacBook Air M1 as an advantage for PC is also surprising, given that the Intel variants don't differ all that much in this regard. Another interesting note by many: Why is Intel so concerned about running ads in a marketing war against a competitor with an only 1 digit share of the chip market. It's exactly this that shows how desperate the company is, and the "If you... Then you're on a PC" jokes are only profiting from it.



Intel's not oblivious, they know that they're in deep water, but they can't admit it publicly. However, whether or not the company is doing itself any favors with the current, poorly received campaign remains to be seen. Next, the 30-year-old argument that Windows computers are better for gaming has, in this case, less to do with the advantage of any specific chip and more to do with which OS more games are available on. As correct as this claim may be, it's not thanks to Intel.